Inquiry
FCC chairman to ask agency to clarify whether Americans have to turn on cellular phone ads

FCC chairman to ask agency to clarify whether Americans have to turn on cellular phone ads

NEW YORK — The Federal Communications Commission is expected to announce Tuesday that it will consider whether citizens can turn off cell phone ads if they’re using a cell phone without an antenna.

The proposal, which would go into effect next year, would require consumers to turn off their cellular phones or turn them off completely for a year, the agency said Tuesday in a statement.

A cell phone is typically a phone with a Wi-Fi antenna, but some people have also turned off cellular radios, including ones in cars, vans and other vehicles, the FCC said.

The agency has not determined how the change will affect the advertising of cellular phones.

But the move is expected, given the FCC’s decision to reverse a 2014 ruling that said the agency must let consumers turn off cellular radio signals.

The FCC is currently conducting a review of its own rules that apply to the devices and to other devices, which is expected by the end of the year.

The review, the first step toward a final rule, will determine whether the changes would be consistent with the FCC mandate.